defra

Is it Knotweed? And where do you stand with the law? Don’t panic. Everything you need to know is right here.

The legalities surrounding Japanese Knotweed are complex, which is the way lawyers like it.

So it always pays to seek professional advice if you suspect you’ve got an infestation or Knotweed has crept under the fence from next door.

But, we’ll do our best to cut through the confusion and summarise the basics below:

Is it Japanese Knotweed?

Japanese Knotweed looks very similar to other plants. If you think you have Knotweed on your property, just e-mail 3 or 4 photos to info@knotweedbusters.com and we’ll tell you what you’re dealing with FREE of charge.

If you require our knotweed removal services we will create a plan and issue you with a Insurance backed guarantee for the japanese knotweed treatment plan

If it is Japanese Knotweed, what next?

Don’t panic. Do act quickly.

Although it’s not against the law to have Japanese Knotweed on your land, it is an offence to allow it to spread.

If it invades neighbouring land, civil action may be taken, and you could be fined up to £5,000 and face six months in prison.

Under the Crime and Policing Act 2014, Anti-Social Control Orders (ASBOs) can be brought against those who fail to act.

And that’s not all.

Under the Environmental Protection Act 1990 and the Hazardous Waste Regulations 2005, all Japanese Knotweed material is controlled waste and any movement requires expensive and specific transport and disposal.

What if Japanese Knotweed invades your land?

First of all contact your neighbour and inform them about the issues arising from a Japanese Knotweed infestation. It doesn’t hurt to ask how they intend to resolve the problem.

After all, your neighbour might not be aware of their responsibilities to stop it spreading.